Free Shipping on All Orders 1-866-764-1801

Vist our Online Store
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 28 of 28
  1. #1

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default Replacing attached power cords with IEC connector

    Anyone have any good links with tips, or just have some experience with, replacing an attached power cord with an IEC connector?

    Thanks,
    Rob
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  2. #2
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    Hello Rob,
    I've done a few of those. You can remove the existing power cord from the chassis, then use a "metal nibbler" to make a rectangular opening to fit the IEC socket. I usually will place masking tape over the intended area and then use a fine tip pen to draw the outline. The original hole, where the power cord went through, should give you a beginning place for the nibbler. Another approach is to use a rectangular chassis punch to create the hole. Then you can either use a "snap-in" IEC socket or one with mounting holes. The snap-in type will usually work with slightly thicker chassis metal and not be too lose. The mounting hole type requires two holes, obviously. You can find IEC sockets that built-in filters, etc.
    I hope this helps.
    Ken

  3. #3

    Member Sales Rating: (49)

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wyred 4 Sound
    Posts
    11,218

    Default

    Where is the best place to buy the sockets??
    No Way But The Hard Way, So Get Used To It!!!

  4. #4

    Member Sales Rating: (31)

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    14,789

    Default

    Parts Express, Sonic Craft, etc...
    "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

  5. #5

    Member Sales Rating: (49)

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wyred 4 Sound
    Posts
    11,218

    Default

    Any quality ones to look for??
    No Way But The Hard Way, So Get Used To It!!!

  6. #6

    Member Sales Rating: (31)

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    14,789

    Default

    I've never made any comparisons between brands.
    "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

  7. #7

    Member Sales Rating: (58)

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    6 Underground
    Posts
    25,306

    Default

    I use a Dremel to make the socket hole. Any brand will do fine.

  8. #8

    Member Sales Rating: (16)

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    State college PA
    Posts
    1,422

    Default

    Here is a good socket at a good price.And its 20% off right now.

    >> http://www.soniccraft.com/products/c...utech_fi10.htm

    They have some for 12.00 too.But Id go for one with screw terminals.
    SDA-2BTL with custom IC
    Adcom 565 monoblocks--Monarchy Audio M-10 preamp
    Theta Data Basic Transport--Camelot Arthur DAC--Camelot Dragon Pro2 MK III
    Harman Kardon T-55c TT
    DH Labs Q-10 Signature Speaker Cables With Furez silver plated copper bananas
    Prophecy Cryo-Silver Reference AES/EBU
    Prophecy Cryo-Silver i2s digital cable
    4 Furutech FP-314Ag with FI-11cu Plugs/FI-11AG IECs--- Power Cords
    DH LABS REVELATIONS ICs-amps
    Revelation Audio Labs Paradise cryo-silver ICs-Source to pre

  9. #9

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Thanks guys! That's exactly the info I was looking for. I thought it might be as easy as just cutting out the hole, but I haven't tried and it don't have any "spares" to experiment on. A dremel and masking tape I have. Using metal shears sounds like it might be more precise, but this is pretty heavy steel. Not sure I could get shears through it. The chassis punch isn't something I thought of. I'll have to look into that too.
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  10. #10

    Member Sales Rating: (49)

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wyred 4 Sound
    Posts
    11,218

    Default

    Rob thanks for posting this thread. I want to do my Pioneer SC-07.
    No Way But The Hard Way, So Get Used To It!!!

  11. #11

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    You're most welcome. I'm thinking my SC-05 and the Mackie amps will get this treatment. I got some Pangea PCs after seeing how much people liked them in the other thread. They lowered the noise floor in all my sources considerably, including getting rid of a very slight hum in one. I'm thinking that replacing the PCs on the rest of the gear is the next logical step to see if that gets rid of a very slight hum in the amps I've never been able to completely vanquish. I certainly noticed an immediate improvement in sound, and the improvements are all easily attributable to the lower noise floor.
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  12. #12

    Member Sales Rating: (45)

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    NC Foothills
    Posts
    4,636

    Default

    That is it, I'm getting off the fence and doing this to my Denon Power Amp. Thanks for the info guys.

  13. #13

    Member Sales Rating: (13)

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    The Mars Hotel
    Posts
    31,225

    Default

    The Furutech IEC's are excellent.

    A word of caution before cutting and drilling. Make sure you're not going to hit anything inside the chassis and make sure that there is actually room to mount an IEC.
    'Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

  14. #14

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Anyone have a manf. or link to a chassis punch? The only one I've found so far in the right size was ~450 bucks. If not, guess I'll be getting out the good ol' dremel in a few.
    Last edited by quadzilla; 07-25-2010 at 08:45 AM.
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  15. #15
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    I don't have a specific part number, but Greenlee is the company most known for chassis punches. Try Mouser's catalogue.

  16. #16
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    I looked in Mouser's catalog and didn't find anything specific to recommend. The square chassis punches are very expensive. My nibbler tool will cut up to 18 gauge (.046") steel and 1/16" aluminum and with a little practice can make an almost perfect rectangle. The nice thing about the nibbler is you can control the cuttings. Each time you take a "bite" the small residue comes away with the tool. You can make sure there's no metal shavings to worry about. That's handy when the piece of equipment is occupied.
    I keep an eye out on CL for Greenlee punches all the time but haven't found a square one.
    Cheers, Ken

  17. #17

    Member Sales Rating: (13)

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Exit Seventy-three on the LIE
    Posts
    1,305

    Default

    It's pretty simple to do, and worth it.

    FWIW, I used a Dremel and a nibbler tool, either one will work fine, but the nibbler makes the cutouts nice and neat.

  18. #18

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    OK. I checked a couple of hardware stores for a nibbler, but no luck. Guess I'll try some more.
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  19. #19

    Member Sales Rating: (47)

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sufficiently Breathless
    Posts
    11,279

    Default

    Ken,, how would you wire an IEC when the cord that you are replacing is two pronged?I'm not an EE,,hence the elementary question.I'm struggling because the IEC has 3 vs 2 (stock power cord on amp which is captive)
    Thanks.
    JC approves....he told me so. (F-1 nut)

  20. #20
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    They can be found in Mouser's catalog and GC Chemicals.

  21. #21

    Member Sales Rating: (31)

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    14,789
    "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

  22. #22
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    Hello George,
    The three prong cord has a "hot" and a "neutral", which are side-by-side and ground connection that is a round pin. Your audio component will just have a hot and neutral wire to connect. If you were to hold the IEC socket as if it were already installed in the component's chassis and the ground lug were on top, the "hot" would be the left prong and the "neutral" would be the right prong. As far as your component's hot and neutral wires, the best approach would be to use two "alligator-clip leads" and a VOM. Use the clip leads to connect the component's bare wires to the hot and neutral terminals of the installed IEC socket. Then, with the component turned on, use the VOM to measure the AC voltage between the component's chassis ground and the neutral terminal. Then, after turning off the component, reverse the two wires on the two IEC terminals. Remeasure between the chassis ground and the neutral IEC terminal. Pick the connection that has the lowest voltage present between the chassis ground and the neutral terminal.
    There won't be anything connected to the IEC ground terminal.
    I hope this is helpful.
    Ken

  23. #23

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Face View Post
    Ah, thanks, that would be what I'm looking for. One hardware store tried to sell me some electric shears for 190. That was a bit more than I was prepared to spend for this project for just tools.
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  24. #24

    Member Sales Rating: (5)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Richardson, TX.
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Guess it'll be a dremel... The Mackies are 14 ga steel.
    Are you part of the dirty digital peasants or a member of the great Analog Master Race?

    SDA Recommended Playlist https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...FZCRkdxYXVNanc

    Open for editing.

  25. #25

    Member Sales Rating: (47)

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sufficiently Breathless
    Posts
    11,279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth Swauger View Post
    Hello George,
    The three prong cord has a "hot" and a "neutral", which are side-by-side and ground connection that is a round pin. Your audio component will just have a hot and neutral wire to connect. If you were to hold the IEC socket as if it were already installed in the component's chassis and the ground lug were on top, the "hot" would be the left prong and the "neutral" would be the right prong. As far as your component's hot and neutral wires, the best approach would be to use two "alligator-clip leads" and a VOM. Use the clip leads to connect the component's bare wires to the hot and neutral terminals of the installed IEC socket. Then, with the component turned on, use the VOM to measure the AC voltage between the component's chassis ground and the neutral terminal. Then, after turning off the component, reverse the two wires on the two IEC terminals. Remeasure between the chassis ground and the neutral IEC terminal. Pick the connection that has the lowest voltage present between the chassis ground and the neutral terminal.
    There won't be anything connected to the IEC ground terminal.
    I hope this is helpful.
    Ken
    Perfect-thanks Ken.
    JC approves....he told me so. (F-1 nut)

  26. #26

    Member Sales Rating: (1)

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Thornton, CO
    Posts
    240

    Default

    Hey guys,
    I know it's a few days later, but, I installed these on all 3 of my Carver amps. I would highly recommend removing the rear panel before attacking it with a dremel or shears. I actually had a machinist buddy hog mine out with an end mill with great results.
    Just my 2 cents.

  27. #27
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    Hello,
    I've dug up some additional information on finding a suitable chassis punch. A Switchcraft IEC socket measures 1.19" wide and 0.81" high. The Greenlee chassis punch 60040 will make a hole 1.181" by 0.866" that should be a very good fit. Next step is to save up $350.00 and buy one, I'll let everyone know the results.
    Cheers, Ken

  28. #28

    Member Sales Rating: (1)

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    central Illinois
    Posts
    3,559

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth Swauger View Post
    Hello,
    I've dug up some additional information on finding a suitable chassis punch. A Switchcraft IEC socket measures 1.19" wide and 0.81" high. The Greenlee chassis punch 60040 will make a hole 1.181" by 0.866" that should be a very good fit. Next step is to save up $350.00 and buy one, I'll let everyone know the results.
    Cheers, Ken
    That looks like the next big thing from Larry(toolfan). I can't believe those are that pricey 350.00/500.00 for the same tool...crazy prices. I can see spending that much IF I did 4-5 a day it would pay for itself, but 3-4 over 8-10 yrs not so much....

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Similar Threads

  1. SOLD Power Cords
    By pearsall001 in forum For Sale (FS) Classifieds
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-09-2009, 07:45 AM
  2. Wanted Power cords
    By inspiredsports in forum Wanted (WTB) Classifieds
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-17-2009, 01:18 PM
  3. DIY Power cords
    By mmadden28 in forum Basic Hookup/Wiring Questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-23-2008, 09:20 AM
  4. Replies: 46
    Last Post: 08-20-2008, 02:56 AM
  5. Replies: 51
    Last Post: 05-26-2007, 12:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts