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  1. #1

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    Default Digital Video Essentials

    I just got this in the mail from Amazon.com. I haven't opened it yet. I want to know if I got the wrong disc. I says NTSC version on it and on the back it mentions they have three versions ??? I don't remember ever seeing a choice?

    I have an HDTV, HD Cable, and DVD player

    does anyone know?
    McCarts
    ___________
    Onkyo TX-SR600 (receiver)
    Sony 5 disc DVD changer (dvd player)
    Toshiba 36" TV HDTV ready
    Comcast HDTV cable box (good for a few shows anyway)
    CSI30 (Center)
    RTi38 (Front Mains)
    FXi30 (surrounds - on side walls set to dipole)
    CSi175 (rear center surround)
    Cambridge Soundworks Cube8 (sub)

  2. #2

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    Mine is NTSC - no problems.

    There is a subwoofer calibration channel level error in this disc, though. It runs way too hot.
    "What we do in life echoes in eternity"

    Ed Mullen (emullen@svsound.com)
    Director - Technology and Customer Relations
    Specialty Technologies
    SVSound

  3. #3

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    Thumbs up

    I also have the NTSC version, no problems.

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    NTSC is an acronym that stands for National Television Systems Committee. The name of the television and video standard in use in the United States. Consists of 525 horizontal lines at a field rate of 60 fields per second. (Two fields equals one complete Frame). Only 486 of these lines are used for picture. The rest are used for sync and extra information such as VITC and Closed Captioning. This is the color video standard used in the United States and Japan.

    PAL is an acronym that stands for Phase Alternate Line. The television and video standard use in most of Europe, Hong Kong and the Middle East. Consists of 625 horizontal lines at a field rate of 50 fields per second. (Two fields equals one complete Frame). Only 576 of these lines are used for picture. The rest are used for sync or extra information such as VITC and Closed Captioning.


    So you want the NTSC version :)

  5. #5

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    Actually if it states NTSC-J on it, it won’t work. Japan also runs in the NTSC standard, but a majority of there items will have the -J at the end.

  6. #6

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    You got the right one.. I seen the same thing in the past and the other versions are either for pal or the HDTV which was for a DVHS player which would of been a VHS tape..

    Open her up and have fun!

  7. #7

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    The other 2 version of DVE are 1080i and 720p D-Theater tapes (D-VHS). The tapes are protected and require a JVC D-Theater tape player to decode to component HD video output.
    Best Regards, Cliff

  8. #8

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    Thanks!!

    Dr. Spec what do you mean by Hot? volume to high?
    McCarts
    ___________
    Onkyo TX-SR600 (receiver)
    Sony 5 disc DVD changer (dvd player)
    Toshiba 36" TV HDTV ready
    Comcast HDTV cable box (good for a few shows anyway)
    CSI30 (Center)
    RTi38 (Front Mains)
    FXi30 (surrounds - on side walls set to dipole)
    CSi175 (rear center surround)
    Cambridge Soundworks Cube8 (sub)

  9. #9

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    Yes, Joe Kane productions has admitted they fouled up the subwoofer calibration level.

    They claim it is 5 dB too high. I claim it is 10 dB to high, but what do I know?

    Regardless, it is way too high. There is a big thread over at HTF on it - do a search for DVE and you'll find the thread.

    Bottom line, don't use the sub calibration on DVE or you'll barely hear/feel it.

    I went from 75 dB to 92 dB when it hits the sub tone, if it helps anyone to know specifics.
    "What we do in life echoes in eternity"

    Ed Mullen (emullen@svsound.com)
    Director - Technology and Customer Relations
    Specialty Technologies
    SVSound

  10. #10

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    were is the home theater forum - if that is what HTF stands for

  11. #11

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    Right here...

    www.hometheaterforum.com
    Last edited by GZ; 10-31-2003 at 09:42 PM.

  12. #12

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    GZ - thanks greatly appricated :D

  13. #13

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    "They claim it is 5 dB too high. I claim it is 10 dB to high, but what do I know?"

    Doc,

    Using a real time spectrum analyzer my in room meauserment of the LFE output on DVE was between 9-10 dB high. This was after calibrating the system with AVIA.
    Best Regards, Cliff

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