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Thread: questions

  1. #1

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    Does anyone know the crossover point for the sda srs 2.3 or crs+? I made a homemade center out of my rta11 and it seems to sound as if the crossover point is lower (more tweeter, less woofer) than the crs or the srs 2.3. Now it could be the box itself creating unwanted resonance or some other issue, but just wanted to verify. Also does anyone know the ohm impedence of the mw6503 and mw6510? I was going to try something else (its a secret for now...and it will remain a secret unless it works well)

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    2nd order Butterworth, impedance compensated at 2Khz.
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    Originally posted by RuSsMaN
    2nd order Butterworth, impedance compensated at 2Khz.
    What does impedance compensated for mean at 2Khz? Does that mean the resister + capacitor impedance = 8 Ohm at 2Khz?

    Originally posted by i4gotmyid


    I was going to try something else (its a secret for now...and it will remain a secret unless it works well)

    ahhh please do tell.... we can only help

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    Originally posted by RuSsMaN
    2nd order Butterworth, impedance compensated at 2Khz.
    I think it means that to compensate for the *particular* impedance curve of the driver (large peaks), certain characteristics of the coil must be "compensated for" in order to attain the crossover frequency desired. You can't just run a "cross-over calculator" assuming an "8 ohm" driver, and plug in any old driver and get a nice cross at the desired frequency.

    The compensation is achieved by adding electrical components across the driver coil so that to the crossover network the impedance of the driver 'looks' like the resistive load you assumed when you designed the crossover.

    Or something like that.

    So, if you put in a different driver that has a different impedance curve, then you could indeed get a different electrical crossover frequency for that driver. This is one reason that "off the shelf" crossovers are always of questionable value. Compensation is in my opinion "higher level" crossover design. If a cross-over calculator is Algebra 1, compensation is Diffy Q.
    Last edited by burdette; 12-01-2003 at 04:28 PM.
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    Originally posted by burdette


    Or something like that.
    Thats what I thought Bro!

    Comes down to real and imaginary components to the equation a+bj are as close to a match as possible.

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