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  1. #1

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    Default How do you Rip 24-bit cd's to Mac?

    I have several 24 bit cd's that I've been ripping into my iTunes library using WAV, but when I check it afterwards it always says 16 bit. I've tried using XLD and same thing. I even tried it using AIFF and no luck either. Right now I'm trying to rip "Bolero" from Reference Recordings label and it says it is a 24 bit cd.

    Anybody have a way to do this?

  2. #2

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    No normal redbook CD is going to be 24 bit.

    If it's on a DVD, then it could be 24.

    Likely it's saying it came from a 24 bit source.

    CJ
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    What he said
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  4. #4

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    well that seems weird to me as I have some Sony SBM CD's that say 24 bit. I have never tried to rip them other than straight copy for the car player.

    So are they true 24 bit CD's ?

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    A quick Google search seems to indicate the master was recorded using 24 bit technology, but the CD is mastered in 16 bit. Maybe you can get lucky and buy the actual 24 bit file from HD Tracks, or some other high-res site. The sticker on the CD indicating 24 bit is marketing to make the buyer think they are getting something better than a CD.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by pitdogg2 View Post
    So are they true 24 bit CD's ?
    There's no such thing
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  7. #7

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    A playable CD cannot contain other than 44.1 - 16 bit. Period.

    Read more carefully and I think you'll see them say something like 24 bit master.

    However, just to avoid confusion (or make some maybe), you can burn files onto a CD as a data disc that contains any data rate and depth as long as it fits size-wise.

    One of the best sounding CD's I have is one of the DXD, which proclaims loudly it's origination from much higher rate data. And indeed, it sounds really good. So just because you have a CD which only stores as 16 bit, don't think that can't mean good audio. It's just not at a higher data rate and the potential to be better yet.

    CJ
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AsSiMiLaTeD View Post
    There's no such thing
    Yep....may be from a recording containing 24 bit material. Which in any case 16/44 or standard redbook cd can sound truly amazing if the recording was up to snuff.

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    How does that work with HDCD's which are supposedly 20-bit?

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    The recording may be 20 bit or even 24 bit, but will be down sampled to 16/44 to play. Will they sound better anyway ? Chances are yes, they will just because your starting off with a better quality recording being transferred to the cd.

    I have always said don't sell 16/44 short, it's all in the quality of the recording. A well recorded redbook 16/44 cd can sound every bit as good as some SACD's. Some that is....
    Last edited by tonyb; 07-04-2013 at 10:27 AM.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by CoolJazz View Post
    A playable CD cannot contain other than 44.1 - 16 bit. Period.

    Read more carefully and I think you'll see them say something like 24 bit master.

    However, just to avoid confusion (or make some maybe), you can burn files onto a CD as a data disc that contains any data rate and depth as long as it fits size-wise.

    One of the best sounding CD's I have is one of the DXD, which proclaims loudly it's origination from much higher rate data. And indeed, it sounds really good. So just because you have a CD which only stores as 16 bit, don't think that can't mean good audio. It's just not at a higher data rate and the potential to be better yet.

    CJ
    Nope not true. HDCDs are 20 bit and are playable in a standard cd player. The decoder in a standard cd player just truncates the stream and loses the last 4 bits of info per (digital) word. if you have an HDCD decoder or player then you can make full use of the 20 bit word, which I believe the last 4 bits are used to increase the dynamic range.
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dudeinaroom View Post
    Nope not true. HDCDs are 20 bit and are playable in a standard cd player. The decoder in a standard cd player just truncates the stream and loses the last 4 bits of info per (digital) word. if you have an HDCD decoder or player then you can make full use of the 20 bit word, which I believe the last 4 bits are used to increase the dynamic range.
    Yeah...I know. I wrote some verbage about the HDCD but somehow it went away and I didn't bother to rewrite. i was trying to clarify for someone trying to figure out what was going on, and didn't leave room in my response for the HDCD trick that's kind of somewhere in between.

    I think the way they worded it for HCDC was redbook compatible. It's a 16 bit format with tricks to enable the player equipped with the decoder to know differences. I'm not so sure you're correct in the way your thinking that it's burnt as a 20 bit word and truncated in other players. Was the extra bits buried in the error correction maybe, I can't remember now. It's not worth playing word games over the details of exactly what they did. But they did do something very difficult in making an advance, while remaining fully redbook compatible.

    CJ
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  13. #13

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    You could download the trial of AppGeeker and follow a tutorial for ripping task.
    I have been able to use it to rip my DVD movies files onto my MacBook Pro. I dont know if it has options to rip CDs, but it is worth a try.
    http://www.ilikemall.com/convert/rip...o-avi-mac.html

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