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  1. #1

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    Default TV to DVD connections

    Well, my old "cable ready" TV died the other day and I bought a new Toshiba flat screen. I went from one input to 12 or so so I need a few questions answered.

    My DVD player has S-Video out, Component video out and the regular RCA connections (also has digital outputs which I don't use).

    Which connection does anyone recommend? The DVD manual states the same phrases for both S-Video and Component video. "Will provide higher quality picture playback". Ok, so which one do I hook up? Will they both give me sound and picture or do I have to hook up a "Y" connection for the RCA's to split for the preamp and the TV? Will the S-Video cable give me sound as well?

    I know this is probably redundant to most of you but for me this is all brand new! I didn't realize TV's had changed so much!

    Any and all input is invited.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Some may disagree but component gives the best picture. Good cables will make a difference as well.

  3. #3

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    As a matter of fact, component video cables give a much clearer and detailed picture, but no matter which you choose, S-video or component, these are video only jacks. You will still nee a pair of rca style jacks for your audio, if you want 2 channel only out of your DVD player, or a fiber optic cable if you want dolby digital 5.1 surround. Check out this site regarding the video cables:


    www.projectorcentral.com/component.htm

    But it is important to remember that the audio portion of a DVD is usually going to be 5.1, so a digital fiber optic cable (toslink) is a nessesity.
    Rocky Bennett

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by therockman
    [
    But it is important to remember that the audio portion of a DVD is usually going to be 5.1, so a digital fiber optic cable (toslink) is a nessesity. [/B]
    Digital coax works too and is preferred by many. I use toslink because I didn't know any better

  5. #5

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    Actually digital coax does have a wider band width that some peple, including me, have attributed to producing a wider sound stage. The coax is great in most set ups, but when you are talking a home entertainment center where the audio and video will be on at the same time, the coax does have a rather bad reputation of having a loud RF hum. In a pure audio set up, go coax, in an audio video set up, go toslink, less suseptable to RF hum.
    Rocky Bennett

  6. #6

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    I have this much so far. Component video connections are the way to go, check.

    But..., as for the audio RCA connections (since I don't run digital lines, no surround for this guy!) I take it I will need a "Y" splitter to take the audio signal to the TV and preamp from the DVD player. The TV does have audio out jacks but the way I figure it, that would mess with the signal too much before it goes to the preamp. My wife will want stereo sound in the TV for regular stuff, not to mention the kids DVD's, and I'll want it in the 2 channel rig for me. So..., is purchasing a "Y" splitter the only option for the RCA's?

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