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  1. #1

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    Question not wide enough screen

    Ok got to ask, maybe I missed something.
    I bought a widescreen tv to avoid those annoying bars on screen when watching dvd.
    I still have them, on most new releases,
    smaller but still there.
    I have a choice:
    A. watch the movie, with bars,(something my owners manual warns will burn my screen,
    and after spending 4k on it I'm reluctant to do.
    B. watch in "expand or zoom mode" which cuts down the sides and negates the reason I bought a widescreen in the first place.
    I understand that 16x9 is 1.78 aspect, and that most new films are 1.85 or higher, even 2.35.
    My question is:
    Why the !#*! didn't they, when "everyone" agreed that 16x9 was the ultimate solution,
    decide on something wider....say 19x9 or?

    -luc

  2. #2

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    Default

    a majority of the movies out there have an OAR of 16:9, that is why that was chosen. director's today keep leaning to 'wider is better', and no industry standard is going to cram their creativity into a said defined box, if they want it at 2.35:1, that's what it will be. i know, you dish out the cash for that set to eliminate the black bars, and you are still getting them. as for how to watch it, i'd watch it in OAR, i mean, you got the 16:9 TV, you must appreciate seeing all of what the director intended you to see, why 'expand and zoom' and take that away again. as for burn in of the black bars, if eveything is calibrated correctly, i wouldn't see how this could be a problem. what set did you get, and have you read of any 'burn-in' problems on it???
    ...the fOrce is strong with this one.

  3. #3
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    Only use exand and zoom when the image is non-anamorphically enhanced; when the image appears squished or figures appear thin. Examples: A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS, ANNIE HALL, THE POPE OF GREENWICH VILLAGE (right off the top of my head).

    In all other situations -- except 4:3 stuff like CASABLANCA or HIGH NOON, films made before "widescreen" -- just use FULL or NORMAL view and DEAL WITH the smaller black bars.

    Suck it up.

    Why? Because you have a widescreen TV, and the black bars are heckofaless than they'd appear on a regular square 4:3 TV and your TV is much closer to the shape of an actual movie screen and yet unless you use curtains or mattes, you can not alter the size of your screen as movie theaters regularly do to accommodate the different aspects being used by filmmakers.

    Don't be angry about the black bars -- they are there for a reason: that's the shape of the image.

    You will of course be overjoyed when you pop in an anamorphically enhanced OAR that fills your complete widescreen -- the new MGM version of DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS f'rinstance -- but that's only because its OAR falls more closely to 16:9 than say, BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI, which, as an extremely widescreen film, 2.35:1, will still have black bars on a 16:9 TV.

    You're widescreen now, enjoy it! Quit belly aching about black bars! (That comment goes out to everyone who is belly aching. Now I'm going to get some coffee. Maybe I'll calm down.)

    MC!
    ultramicah@yahoo.com

    "There's nothing funny about a clown in the moonlight." - Lon Chaney

  4. #4

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    Post Juice

    I got the mitsubishi 55 diamond.
    No burn in problems...yet...
    just want to keep it that way.

  5. #5

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    Post Micah

    Put a little something in that coffee.

    Yeah yeah I know...

    The whole thing reminds me of the story about the guy who kept bumping his head on the doorway into his house.
    One day he declares he's had enough, and decides to rebuild the doorway. Once he had everything torn out, he decides, "what the hell?
    I'll rebuild the whole damn house", which he does.
    As he's stepping through the doorway of his new house, he bangs his head.....only not as hard.

    -luc

  6. #6
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    Default

    I just get tired of this whole widescreen vs 4:3, fill-the-screen vs "black bars" thing.

    Get a widescreen TV. All movies (today) are filmed in widescreen aspect ratios. Understand that TVs in the future will all be widescreen TVs. All TV shows will ultimately be widescreen formatted.

    Understand that films are filmed in a variety of aspects, from full screen 4:3 to extreme widescreen 2.90:1 or whatever BEN HUR is, and understand that your widescreen TV is as close as you can get to revealling the complete widescreen picture of the film medium. It has its flaws, one being that you will occassionally have black bars when the film is a wider-than-your-widescreen-tv ratio.

    Maybe what I'm angry at is the industry's foisting of this technology on us humans without TEACHING us the basics and making us understand the ins-and-outs of it. You'd think that "an educated consumer would be their best customer," as Syms said, but they tend to just blunder around confusing customers.

    Don't be confused. Buy widescreen. Watch it on FULL setting. Buy anamorphic DVDs. Enjoy film the way it should be seen. Ignore broadcast TV.

    Grrrrrr.

    MC
    ultramicah@yahoo.com

    "There's nothing funny about a clown in the moonlight." - Lon Chaney

  7. #7
    Spaceman Spiff
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    Default

    As long as you rotate between ARs of 1.85:1 and 2.35:1 you will never have burn in problems.


    Peace Out~:D
    If...
    Ron dislikes a film = go out and buy it.
    Ron loves a film = don't even rent.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Show me proof of burn-in with RPTVs.

    MC
    ultramicah@yahoo.com

    "There's nothing funny about a clown in the moonlight." - Lon Chaney

  9. #9

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    Default

    Actually if you get the right TV burning the tubes is not a problem. Marantz and zenith (the two i can think of off the top of my head) don't have 'black bars' they use gray. Why? well gray uses all three guns to create that color, hence burning the tubes equally. Smart eh?

    Per your comments with the aspect ratios. You will just have to deal with it =).. OR you can get a projector, and draper screen with teh t/b/l/r motorized masking. Then get your handy dandy rc5000, or rc5200 and setup some macros for each aspect ratio. =)

    Kinda overkill but it is a solution =)

    Best thing I can suggest these days is a DLP projector, since you cannot 'burn' mirrors you can watch whatever you want on them and never worry about hurting it

    Brandon

  10. #10

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    Default bars

    all it says is not to watch the tv with the bars for more than 15% of the time.

    micah i am thinking of sending in for the system showcase would it be ok for me to zip the files when i send them i cant atach more than one at a time?

  11. #11

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    micah,

    are you disagreeing about tube burn? Turn your your rptv on and leave stock quotes running on it all day for 2-3 months. then put a white picture up on teh screen. you will notice wher ethe stock quotes ran it will be noticable darker...

    a perfect example for you is to go to an arcade and look at an older game. rear projection is just like a 'tube' set, both will burn the tubes if you aren't careful. Thats why most video consoles (ps2, xbox ect) forwarn you about it...

    Brandon


    PS man i hope i am not coming across as a know-it-all jerk...first day on here and i've already disagreed with many people...sorry guys if i have offended anyone...

  12. #12

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    brandon, your fired!!!

    just kidding man, good to have you on board...:D
    ...the fOrce is strong with this one.

  13. #13

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    Thumbs up

    Whewwwww,

    At least I can count on one person! :D

    Brandon

  14. #14
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    Default

    I don't know... I watch ONLY FILMS on my WS RPTV. (No regular TV.) And some are anamorphic 1.33 (fill the screen completely) and some are less so, wider aspects that leave varying widths of black bars at the top and bottom of the screen. Are you saying that I will have black bar burn-in from watching films with wider widths than 16:9?

    I thought that those bars were actually part of the projected image and would not be burning in. I thought that only tubes burned in, not reflections (in a RPTV, they are reflections of tube images, tho, right?).

    I'm questioning whether or not I'm having burn in. I'm vaguely disturbed by this. Post images or links to further information, please.

    And kill that new guy, BrandonW. You know we can't have new people running around in this forum! (KIDDING, BrandonW -- welcome on board, please stay and help us. We need it.)

    Micah
    ultramicah@yahoo.com

    "There's nothing funny about a clown in the moonlight." - Lon Chaney

  15. #15

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    Black bars are no light. Projected bars will be a color or grey. Most widescreen sets and most tvs that use the bars are black and can/will cause you to burn the tubes if your not careful. Thats why I think the new idea with zenith/marantz and others that use grey bars is an awesome idea. Another good approach now is using the DLP rear projection sets. SInce dlps use mirrors to reflect light, there is no chance of damaging the tubes (cus they dont have them) The downside is the price, rear projection dlps are a tad pricy...

    Although you are only watching widescreen films, you can still run into issues. Its no differant than having a 4:3 set, as you aren't using part of the tubes during the movie.

    Have you ever seen an older video game(like in arcade) where you can see text thats not supposed to be there when something bright is on the screen? Thats really the best way i can show you what happens. I will try to find a picture on the net for you...

    Brandon

  16. #16
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    Default interesting widescreen article

    Good article on widescreen vs TV ratio here in Slate magazine, including images from BLADE RUNNER showing the differences. Slate magazine, BTW, sucks. But this is pretty good:

    http://slate.msn.com/?id=2061664
    ultramicah@yahoo.com

    "There's nothing funny about a clown in the moonlight." - Lon Chaney

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