Free Shipping on All Orders 1-866-764-1801

Vist our Online Store
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default an audio engineer's comment

    Hello,
    I'm a member of an Ampex forum, you might find this comment, from another member interesting:
    "As one who has made records at both extremes (Bill Evans to the
    Circle Jerks) I've come to the conclusion that records are a cartoon
    of reality anyway. Nothing, for instance, can beat sitting in the
    first row at Jazz at Pearl's in SF on a Monday night right in front
    of the sax section of a 20 piece big band. And I've recorded live in
    that same venue several times. So I don't try to achieve exact
    reality, but a sort of bigger-than-reality that will get beyond the
    speakers; this is the goal of most mixers who want to make their
    clients and public happy. And Stereo is a big part of that.

    As soon as I got my hands on 16 track recording in 1969 (on a
    MM1000), I began experimenting with stereo vocal tracks and
    instruments, culminating in 1970's 'If I Could Only Remember My Name'
    with David Crosby. I recorded many stereo acoustic guitar tracks with
    two mics, and either used them to make a bigger space (helpful when
    there was no more accompaniment) or to give me coverage on the guitar
    sound.

    Funny thing about that album; I never sought out to make a hi-fi
    record, just a good sounding one. I didn't cut back on the EQ or
    compression-indeed some of it was absolutely bright and squashy. Yet
    The Absolute Sound has put it on a list of all-time best records.

    And of course, we had Ampexes to record it all!
    sqb"
    Regards, Ken

  2. #2
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    Here's a follow-up comment:
    "Whatever you did, you did it perfectly. That's one of my all-time
    favorite LPs. (long before TAS picked up on it) Never knew it was
    recorded on Ampex machines until now.

    I especially enjoy what you did with Crosby's voice and the tape
    delays. That's a short track, but it is breathtaking.

    If you want to go into further detail about the technical
    particulars, I'm all ears. <pun intended>"

    If there are some additional details from the recording engineer I'll post them.
    Ken

  3. #3

    Member Sales Rating: (7)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    lookin' for fava beans and a nice chianti
    Posts
    12,608

    Default

    Another great read, Ken.

    BDT
    I plan for the future. - F1Nut

  4. #4

    Member Sales Rating: (40)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    18,401

    Default

    Ken, do you ever just miss your Silvertone? A simpler time?
    Check your lips at the door woman. Shake your hips like battleships. Yeah, all the white girls trip when I sing at Sunday service.

  5. #5
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    Actually, you're not too far off the mark, Russman. When I was a kid my dad had a job as a jukebox repairman for Supreme Amusement Company in Western Maryland. A few times, on Saturdays, I went with him while he fixed jukeboxes in bars all around West Virginia and Maryland. We'd load new 45's and replace worn needles and check out the amplifier tubes. Some of these places had bear's heads on the wall, really rough hewn. He took an old jukebox amplifier and hooked up an RCA 45 changer and connected a speaker to it. Everything was put on an orange crate and my mom made a yellow cloth wrap around cover. This must have been in the middle 50's. I had Roy Rogers records and even some Elvis later on. Loved it. Probably got me hooked on sound.
    Have fun, Ken

  6. #6

    Member Sales Rating: (19)

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Kansas City KS/Central IA
    Posts
    5,650

    Default

    Bing Crosby, Teresa Brewer, and Elvis from a turntable whose brand name I don't remember, a Bogen mono tube amplifier, and a big Utah speaker. It made my parents very happy! I'm setting here with several thousand dollars of audio equipment, and I don't think it makes me any more happy than they were. Sometimes simple is highly under-rated :o
    DKG999
    -----------------------------------------
    HT System: LSi9, LSiCx2, LSiFX, LSi7, SVS 20-39 PC+, B&K 507.s2 AVR, B&K Ref 125.2, Tripplite LCR-2400, Cambridge 650BD, Signal Cable PC/SC, BJC IC, Samsung 55" LED

    Music System: Magnepan 1.6QR, SVS SB12+, ARC pre, Parasound HCA1500 vertically bi-amped, Jolida CDP, Pro-Ject RM5.1SE TT, Pro-Ject TubeBox SE phono pre, SBT, PS Audio DLIII DAC

  7. #7
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    I know what you mean, sometimes everything seems too complex. Wait 15 minutes for the air compressor to get just right to let the tone arm float correctly. Turn on the heater Voltage first, wait 5 minutes to turn on the B+. Take the plastic bags off the screens, then turn on the amplifiers and turn on the power filter for the speakers. Nothing like making life simple? Turn on the power supply for the turntable, clean the record and the stylus, put some Last on the stylus. Now I can listen to a record. Talk about ritual? I think I want another, more simple system, AR turntable, NAD 3020 integrated amp and a pair of Large Advents. Simple.

  8. #8
     Moderator 
    Member Sales Rating: (0)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Polk Audio
    Posts
    3,842

    Default

    Here's another copy of a thread on the Ampex group. This is from Tom Fine, who is the son of Wilma Cozart Fine, who, along with her husband, William Fine, made all of the famous Mercury Living Presence records:
    "Bernie Grundman also did an awesome job on the limited-release of Mercury Living Presence LPs put
    out by Classic Records. My mother oversaw that and we all agreed that Bernie's mastering was as
    great as George Piros's original job, and the Classic heavy vinyl plays better and quieter than the
    original LPs. Those records all long sold out of their limited release. Personally, I still prefer
    the sound of the CD's (and yes, I've heard the LPs on a very tweaky system, as well as my own
    system, which I like very much). A properly remastered CD simply sounds better than an LP to me, but
    most CD's are far from properly remastered.

    If you do still love the vinyl, there are a few good options. I think Hobson usually does very well
    at Classic Records. I have a bunch of Speakers Corner records I like very much, and I think Brian
    Roth's friends in Kansas, Analogue Records, do some very good work. Analogue is a good chance to
    hear very close to what the master tape really sounds like; they seem to do minimal sweetening or
    loudness-enhancement. Their reissues of "Basie Jam" on Pablo, Johnny Hodges/Duke Ellington "Side By
    Side" on Verve and the box set of Riverside Monk albums stand up very well indeed to both the
    original LPs and the CD reissues. All of these labels make some, um, exaggerated advertising claims
    and all are pricey (as in all things audiophool, exaggerated claim = higher price). But it's still
    very thrilling to hear great music jump off the surface of super-quiet vinyl. I just got Speakers
    Corner version of Quincy Jones "Birth of a Band," which was done at Fine Recording. This is the best
    version of this I've heard because the mastering preserved the dynamics and frequency balance of the
    original Mercury LP but took it another step because the s/n is so much higher with that quiet
    vinyl. They also managed to cut the brightness of the full-blare horns into the grooves without
    making it splashy (uh oh, perception terms).

    Ampex content: I'm pretty sure "Basie Jam" and "Side by Side" were mastered on Ampex decks; the Monk
    albums were made at Reeves which used Fairchild until the stereo era (talk about a great-sounding
    mono album -- "Monk's Music").

    -- Tom Fine
    Enjoy, Ken

  9. #9

    Member Sales Rating: (16)

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In A Van Down By The River
    Posts
    21,236

    Default

    Great read...again Ken!

    H9
    "Appreciation of audio is a completely subjective human experience. Measurements can provide a measure of insight, but are no substitute for human judgment. Why are we looking to reduce a subjective experience to objective criteria anyway? The subtleties of music and audio reproduction are for those who appreciate it. Differentiation by numbers is for those who do not".--Nelson Pass

    Pass Aleph 30; Eastern Electric Mini Max; Adcom GDA600; MIT S3/Z Pc; SDA 1C; Squeezebox; Tubes add soul!

  10. #10

    Member Sales Rating: (10)

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Safely in my Faraday cage
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth Swauger
    Ampex Quote follows:
    "As one who has made records at both extremes (Bill Evans to the
    Circle Jerks) I've come to the conclusion that records are a cartoon
    of reality anyway. Nothing, for instance, can beat sitting in the
    first row at Jazz at Pearl's in SF on a Monday night right in front
    of the sax section of a 20 piece big band.
    A very a propo analogy (cartoon). I know that there is much music that I enjoy that I cannot listen to. It is as if most recordings are an amalgam of ideals instead of a group of musicians.
    Just because the ability to manipulate a signal exists, doesn't mean you should. It's stretched and disproportionate. Cartoon-ish and hot-roddy.

    Sean
    Last edited by SKsolutions; 03-01-2006 at 09:39 PM.

  11. #11

    Member Sales Rating: (6)

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    16,477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth Swauger
    Talk about ritual? I think I want another, more simple system, AR turntable, NAD 3020 integrated amp and a pair of Large Advents. Simple.
    There you go, now thats the stuff dreams are made of. I had an AR turntable, loved it.

    Transport: Oppo BDP-103/USB HDD (flac)
    DAC/Preamp: Benchmark DAC/PRE
    Power Amp: Parasound HCA-1500A
    Speakers: Harbeth Compact 7ES-3 Monitor
    Cables: Kimber Hero/8TC; DH Labs D-75

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Similar Threads

  1. Why Polk Audio wasn't Included?
    By stealth in forum Speakers
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-28-2006, 07:21 PM
  2. Fire Sale - Rancho de Audio MKII
    By RuSsMaN in forum For Sale (FS) Classifieds
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-25-2006, 09:09 PM
  3. Comprehending Engineers
    By Frank Z in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-25-2005, 11:24 PM
  4. Ps Audio Power Port.
    By mantis in forum Basic Hookup/Wiring Questions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-12-2005, 08:45 AM
  5. [semi-ot] why isn't audio digital?
    By jackohat in forum Car Audio & Electronics
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-04-2003, 11:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts