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  1. #1

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    Question How to Bi-Amp my polk audio speakers?

    Hi I have a very simple question for you folks. Right now I've bi-wired all of my following speakers.

    Polk CS400i
    Polk RT800i's
    Polk F/X1000's

    into my Technics SADX940 receiver.

    I'm planning to get Denon AVR-3803 and Harmon Kardon PA2000 Pre-Amp and how I can bi-amp my speakers.

    I know each speaker has a set of low and high frequency banana outs. But where the low ones go and where do the high ones go!

    Thanks for the help.
    Panasonic TH-50PX80U Plasma HDTV
    Polk Audio RT800i (fronts)
    Polk Audio CS400i (center)
    Polk Audio F/X1000 (side surrounds)
    Polk Audio RTi6 (back surrrounds)
    Velodyne CHT-15 (subwoofer)
    Yamaha RX-V1400 (Pre/Pro)
    NAD C272 (2-ch Amp)
    Adcom GFA-7605 (5-ch Amp)
    Toshiba SD-3109 (DVD/CD player)
    Malata DVP-580 (Multi-region DVD player)

  2. #2

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    Default hamzahsh

    I know I may be dodging your question on bi-amping your RT800s here, but if I were you, I would get the Denon 3803 receiver and use the money that you would spend to purchase the H/K (power amp??? pre amp with this setup???) and buy a sub instead. I think a subwoofer with the speaker setup that you have and the Denon would make more of a dramatic impact on your sound than trying to "bi-amp" the speakers that you currently have.

    The Denon 3803 should be an improvement in sound over the Technics that you have; the Denon has plenty of power to run your rig. Getting a sub will open up a whole new world of sound for you.

    I could currently bi-amp my mains if I wanted to; but I have chosen not to. My NAD power amp has plenty of power to run my mains and from what i've read, mixing different manufacturers of amps with different gains is tricky in bi-amping even if you have a variable gain adjustment on your power amp.

    Just my 2 cents worth....

  3. #3

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    Default

    To bi-amp, you should have two of the same type amps!

    After that little problem is solved, you would run the right channel out from the low frequency amp to the bottom posts of the right channel speaker. Then run the left channel out from the low frequency amp to the bottom posts of the left channel speaker. Run the right channel out from the high frequency amp to the upper posts of the right channel speaker, then run the left channel out from the high frequency amp to the upper posts of the left channel speaker.

    Btw, speakers do not have "outs", only inputs.
    'Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

  4. #4

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    Default

    Actually I just wanted to know how the bi-amping thing works. I've already bi-wired my speakers and I'm very happy with it I don't think bi-amping would make a hell of a difference as long as the receiver has lot of power to drive my speakers.

    I've also planned to get the Velodyne CHT-15 subwoofer and RT 38i for back surrounds for my well planned Denon AVR-3803.

    My HT system is still not complete :(

    Need lot of money!

    Thanks for the help.

  5. #5

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    Default

    That's cool, glad to help. I forgot to add, remove the jumpers from the speaker posts when bi-wiring or bi-amping. The bi-amping would give you more dynamic range and less distortion, but as you said, "Need lot of money!"
    'Political Correctness'.........defined

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  6. #6
    Spaceman Spiff
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    Default

    I have 4 Adcom 2-channel amps 3 of which bi-amp my mains (RT55's) and my center (CS400). I use one amp per speaker. The right channel powers the high's and the left channel powers the lows.

    Actually I just wanted to know how the bi-amping thing works. I've already bi-wired my speakers and I'm very happy with it I don't think bi-amping would make a hell of a difference as long as the receiver has lot of power to drive my speakers.
    My Marantz put out 75wpc, the Adcom's put out 60wpc. There is a hell of a difference using lower powered seperates over higher powered receivers.

    Peace Out~:D
    If...
    Ron dislikes a film = go out and buy it.
    Ron loves a film = don't even rent.

  7. #7

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    Default

    Ron-P is it possible for you to post a pic or two of the rear of your amps and how they are connected to your speakers? this would be a big help.. as I am a visual type person. sometimes reading it doesn't make much sense to me.. but seeing a picture of it.. suddenly the "light bulb" goes off over my head. ha ha ha.
    thanks
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  8. #8
    Spaceman Spiff
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    Default

    A pic will not show you much. Here is a link to a great read. My rig is set up in the 'vertical' bi-amp method.

    http://www.symphonysound.com/articles/biamp.html


    Peace Out~:D
    If...
    Ron dislikes a film = go out and buy it.
    Ron loves a film = don't even rent.

  9. #9

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    Now if I want to buy amps for my receiver
    which would be Denon AVR-3803
    how many do I need and which ones. Any
    suggestions.
    Panasonic TH-50PX80U Plasma HDTV
    Polk Audio RT800i (fronts)
    Polk Audio CS400i (center)
    Polk Audio F/X1000 (side surrounds)
    Polk Audio RTi6 (back surrrounds)
    Velodyne CHT-15 (subwoofer)
    Yamaha RX-V1400 (Pre/Pro)
    NAD C272 (2-ch Amp)
    Adcom GFA-7605 (5-ch Amp)
    Toshiba SD-3109 (DVD/CD player)
    Malata DVP-580 (Multi-region DVD player)

  10. #10

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    Default

    Ron-P, that was an excellent article on "bi-amping". I never knew about the "rise-time" phenomenum. I was aware of the differences in gains between amps though. Why did you choose "vertical" bi-amping versus "horizontal"? Simpicity, convenience, better sound???

    Hamzahsh,

    Remember what you said, "Need lot of Money?" If you are going to start bi-amping your speakers then you will definitely need that. I would assume that you would want to start by bi-amping your mains (RT800s) first. You would need two amps to do that.

    You can get an idea about pricing from an internet dealer, Reliable Audio and Video:

    http://www.reliableaudiovideo.com/hom1.html

    They have good stuff here. I ordered my NAD from them and am totally satisfied. Warning...you only get a 30 day warranty through them. So there is a risk to take for paying hundreds less than retail. My NAD came in within a week double packaged and in perfect new condition. I've been playing it alot to make sure everything is okay. Electronics tend to go out with the first couple of weeks if something is wrong with them.

    I would recommend Adcom, NAD, or B&K. They have "resonable" prices for them there. I went with the NAD because of its great sound and variable gain input option. The variable gain allows you to match the sound level with your receiver's amps. I use this combo for home theater where my Yamaha runs the center and surrounds and the NAD runs my mains (using the preouts on my receiver). I matched the sound level using the Rat Shack analog SPL meter.

    The variable gain option is an important thing to consider before you make a purchase. It all depends on how you are going to set up your system.

    P.

  11. #11
    Spaceman Spiff
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    Default

    I went the vertical direction because it's less expensive and easier. One amp running one speaker, just made it easier. Also, if an amp goes down only one speaker goes down, not 2. Thus, less re-wiring to get the rig up and running.

    With Vertical, I ran one interconnect from the pre-out to a 'Y' splitter then directly into the L & R inputs on the amp.

    With the Standard you'd need to run the 'Y' splitter directly off the pre-out then run two interconnects to the 'L' and 'R' of each amp.

    Basically, you'll need double the interconnect cables going the Standard bi-amp set-up.

    As for suggesting amps, that's a tough call. I landed all 4 of my Adcoms for under $500 off ebay. They are only 60wpc, but that is all I needed (small HT room). The more power you need, the more your going to spend.


    Peace Out~:D
    If...
    Ron dislikes a film = go out and buy it.
    Ron loves a film = don't even rent.

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