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  1. #1

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    Default Bass Driver frequency reponse along RTIa line

    Im very interested in how each of these drivers handle their frequency response, i think this will direcly affect what the speaker will sound like
    RTIa1/RTIa3: 50/40Hz-27kHz
    1 tweeter,
    1 Mid-Bass driver


    RTIa5: 30Hz-27kHz
    1Tweeter
    Mid Bass Driver 1
    Mid Bass Driver 2

    RTIa7: 20Hz-27kHz
    1 tweeter
    Mid Bass Driver 1
    7.5'' Bass Driver 1
    7.5'' Bass Driver 2

    RTIa9: 18Hz-27kHz
    1 Tweeter
    Mid Bass Driver 1
    Mid Bass Driver 2
    7.5 Bass Driver 1
    7.5 Bass Driver 2
    7.5 Bass Driver 3

    I think it help to discuss the purpose behind the 2 RTIa line up, RTIa5 & RTIa7. whether they r parrallel or ascending
    Front: Polk RTi6
    Center: Polk CSIa4
    Rear: Polk M10
    Receiver: AVR Denon 789
    HTPC Soundcard: Emu-0404 USB for 2.1, Creative X-Fi Platinum for 5.1 (SPDIF out to AVR)
    Headset: Grado RS2 + Grado RA1 amp
    Mic: Neumann KMS605
    TV: Toshiba Regza 52' 120Hz

    Car Audio
    2002 MB C240 Sedan
    MM6501 components
    MM840 sub
    MB Quart Onyx 4.60 (1/2 to components, 3/4 bridged to sub)
    Pioneer 8200BT HU

  2. #2

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    comon guys this suppose to lead to a interesting discussion
    Front: Polk RTi6
    Center: Polk CSIa4
    Rear: Polk M10
    Receiver: AVR Denon 789
    HTPC Soundcard: Emu-0404 USB for 2.1, Creative X-Fi Platinum for 5.1 (SPDIF out to AVR)
    Headset: Grado RS2 + Grado RA1 amp
    Mic: Neumann KMS605
    TV: Toshiba Regza 52' 120Hz

    Car Audio
    2002 MB C240 Sedan
    MM6501 components
    MM840 sub
    MB Quart Onyx 4.60 (1/2 to components, 3/4 bridged to sub)
    Pioneer 8200BT HU

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SivaNevets View Post
    i think this will direcly affect what the speaker will sound like.
    I agree;)

  4. #4

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    Great question,but i dont know the answer.
    Linn AV5140 fronts
    Linn AV5120 Center
    Linn AV5140 Rears
    M&K MX-70 Sub for Music
    Odyssey Mono-Blocs
    SVS Ultra-13 Gloss Black:D

  5. #5

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    What exactly are you asking here?

    The higher up you go in the line...the deeper the bass output is going to be. That's fairly typical of any line of speakers.;)
    The nirvana inducer-
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    PolkAudio SDA 2A's/PolkAudio Monitor 7A's
    Audioquest Type 4 speaker cables
    Audioquest Sidewinder IC's
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  6. #6

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    i mean, for example, A5 go as low as 30hz as advertised, which means 1 of the mid bass driver is handling the lows. think about how A7 handle the bass with 2 seperate bass driver compare to A5?
    Front: Polk RTi6
    Center: Polk CSIa4
    Rear: Polk M10
    Receiver: AVR Denon 789
    HTPC Soundcard: Emu-0404 USB for 2.1, Creative X-Fi Platinum for 5.1 (SPDIF out to AVR)
    Headset: Grado RS2 + Grado RA1 amp
    Mic: Neumann KMS605
    TV: Toshiba Regza 52' 120Hz

    Car Audio
    2002 MB C240 Sedan
    MM6501 components
    MM840 sub
    MB Quart Onyx 4.60 (1/2 to components, 3/4 bridged to sub)
    Pioneer 8200BT HU

  7. #7
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    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by SivaNevets View Post
    Im very interested in how each of these drivers handle their frequency response, i think this will direcly affect what the speaker will sound like
    RTIa1/RTIa3: 50/40Hz-27kHz
    1 tweeter,
    1 Mid-Bass driver


    RTIa5: 30Hz-27kHz
    1Tweeter
    Mid Bass Driver 1
    Mid Bass Driver 2

    RTIa7: 20Hz-27kHz
    1 tweeter
    Mid Bass Driver 1
    7.5'' Bass Driver 1
    7.5'' Bass Driver 2

    RTIa9: 18Hz-27kHz
    1 Tweeter
    Mid Bass Driver 1
    Mid Bass Driver 2
    7.5 Bass Driver 1
    7.5 Bass Driver 2
    7.5 Bass Driver 3

    I think it help to discuss the purpose behind the 2 RTIa line up, RTIa5 & RTIa7. whether they r parrallel or ascending
    Driver
    Any individual diaphragm (cone, dome, etc.) within a speaker that compresses and rarefies the air to create sound waves, such as a woofer, tweeter, midrange, etc.

    Dynamic range
    The difference between loud and soft sounds. A speaker with wide dynamic range — one that can reproduce the sudden and wide changes between loud and soft sounds in music and video soundtracks — will sound more realistic (all other things being equal).

    Efficiency
    Although a speaker's efficiency rating is almost always correlated to its sensitivity rating, it is actually a different measurement. The efficiency rating for a speaker is a measure of how well a speaker converts watts of electrical power into watts of acoustical power. Most speakers have a very low efficiency rating — between 1% and 10% — so manufacturers rarely provide this information, choosing instead to list sensitivity ratings.

    Flat
    When a speaker's response is described as "flat," that's a good thing. It means that the speaker can accurately reproduce a signal that is fed to it without adding unnatural coloration to the sound. Specific frequencies don't sound too loud or too soft.

    Frequency response
    The human ear responds to frequencies from approximately 20 to 20,000 cycles-per-second, or Hertz. A speaker's frequency response indicates how much of that range can be reproduced.

    Front speakers
    In home theater, the front left and right speakers deliver a wide soundstage that blends with the video to create a more realistic and exciting movie experience. In addition to reproducing the musical score, front speakers work with your center channel to reproduce the special effects, along with any on-screen action that moves left to right or vice versa. The front left and right speakers in your home theater system also act as the left and right stereo speakers for listening to music. See our articles on choosing home theater speakers and speaker placement for home theater for more info.

    Hertz (Hz)
    The unit of sound frequency; one Hz is equal to one cycle per second. The range of human hearing is 20-20,000 Hz. Points of reference: low "E" on a bass guitar is 41 Hz; middle "C" on a piano is 262 Hz; cymbals can go out to 15,000 Hz.

    Imaging
    The ability of a speaker to reproduce spatial information in a recording so that you can visualize the relative positioning of individual voices and instruments as you're listening.

    Impedance
    The load value (in ohms) that the speakers present to the amplifier — the amount of resistance to the flow of current. While playing music, a speaker's actual impedance constantly fluctuates; however, speakers are usually given a single nominal impedance rating for easy comparison. Low-impedance speakers (4 ohms or less) can cause problems with receivers or amplifiers that are not designed to deliver large amounts of current.

    ensitivity
    A sensitivity rating tells you how effectively a speaker converts power (watts) into volume (decibels). The higher the rating, the louder your speakers will play with a given amount of amplifier power. Sensitivity is often measured by driving a speaker with one watt and measuring the loudness in decibels at one meter.

    The chart below illustrates that a few dB in sensitivity can make a big difference:

    Speaker Sensitivity rating Power needed
    to produce a given volume
    Speaker A 85 dB 100 watts
    Speaker B 88 dB 50 watts
    Speaker C 91 dB 25 watts
    A speaker with a sensitivity rating that's 3 dB higher than another
    speaker's only needs half as much power to deliver the same amount of sound.

    Understanding Speaker Frequency Response

    http://forum.ecoustics.com/bbs/messa...79/131062.html

    Here's a quick quiz: which of these two speakers sounds better: Speaker A with a frequency response range of 45Hz to 18kHz or, Speaker B with a range of 20Hz to 25kHz? The truth is there's simply not enough data in these numbers to know anything of value. Taken out of context and without other data, a simple set of numbers don't tell you much about real world sound quality. But people make audio buying decisions based on published specifications, such as the frequency response spec, everyday. I'd like to demystify the process for you; let you in on a little industry secret about "The Frequency Response Spec."

    "How Polk Specifies Frequency Response
    Polk Audio publishes two frequency response specifications: "Overall" and "-3dB." "Overall" describes the frequency range limits of the speaker within an amplitude drop off of 9dB. Any frequency re p roduced more than 9dB down from the rest of the frequencies will contribute little to the sound. The "-3dB" spec describes the frequency range limits of the speaker within an amplitude drop off of 3dB.

    I just wrote this big article making the case that these kinds of numbers are not terribly useful in making buying decisions. So why does Polk use them? For better or for worse, these numbers are the norm in the audio industry. To not publish them would leave an impression that our products were not competitive. A better question would be: why don't we publish frequency response and MLSSA graphs in addition to the simple numbers? We feel that these graphs would not be meaningful to the vast majority of consumers. It takes years of working with measurements and loudspeakers before you get a good sense of how the graphs correlate to subjective sound quality. Incorrect interpretation of graphs can easily lead to misinformation and bad choices. Finally, the variation in measurement techniques can make comparing graphs from two different labs or manufacturers unreliable and misleading." (http://forum.ecoustics.com/bbs/messa...79/131062.html).

    ---------------------
    01) DENON AVR-4308CI: Advanced 7.1 CH/5.1+2 CH/ 3.1+2+2 CH A/V Home Theater /MultiMedia Multi-Source/Zone Receiver with Networking and WiFi/170 watts x 7 channels
    02) SUNFIRE Grand Signature - Bob Carver's
    03) OPPO DV-980H 1080p Up-Converting Universal DVD Player with HDMI and 7.1CH Audio
    04) DENON DVD-2500BTCI: Blu-ray Disc™ DVD/CD Digital Player/Transport (change for a OPPO BDP-83 Blu-ray Disc Player will be available soon)
    05) HITACHI P55T501. 55" HD1080 Plasma HDTV
    06) POLKAUDIO LSiC (Center speaker)
    07) POLKAUDIO LSi15 LEFT (Front speaker)
    08) POLKAUDIO LSi15 RIGHT (Front speaker)
    09) POLKAUDIO LSif/x LEFT (Surround speaker)
    10) POLKAUDIO LSif/x RIGHT (Surround speaker)
    11) VELODYNE OPTIMUN SERIES (High Output Digital EQ SubWoofer 2400W/1200WRMS)
    Last edited by Bernal; 07-21-2009 at 11:59 PM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by SivaNevets View Post
    i mean, for example, A5 go as low as 30hz as advertised, which means 1 of the mid bass driver is handling the lows. think about how A7 handle the bass with 2 seperate bass driver compare to A5?
    I've got RTi8's(older RTiA5's)...I believe that 30hz spec is a bit exaggerated...They can hit surprisingly low, given their design, but I don't know about 30hz.

    In the RTi8's and the A5's, the two mid-woofers carry the same frequencies at all times. There isn't a dedicated bass driver.

    The A7's have MUCH better bass output than the A5's, but personally, I prefer the A5's with a nice sub to the A7's. The mid-range in the A7's is a lot more drawn back IMO, and the highs seem a bit on the brighter side in comparison to the A5's. The A9's are definitely the best of the line. They've got the liquidy mid-range, with the D'appolito array which helps tame down the tweeters brightness...and the bass output is very nice.
    The nirvana inducer-
    APC H10 Power Conditioner
    Denon DVD-2910 universal player
    DPA The Little Bit Three DAC
    Yamaha P-300 turntable/TCC TC-750 phono preamp
    Acurus L10 preamp
    Adcom GFA-545 power amp
    PolkAudio SDA 2A's/PolkAudio Monitor 7A's
    Audioquest Type 4 speaker cables
    Audioquest Sidewinder IC's
    Audioquest Black Mamba IC's
    Signal Cable Analog II IC's

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by SivaNevets View Post
    common guys this suppose to lead to a interesting discussion
    Perhaps its already been discussed to death? I think there was a thread like this just a week or two ago wasn't there?

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