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  1. #1

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    Default calling all cooks... need help with a prime rib roast

    so I'm going to cook my first ever prime rib roast in a couple days. and I need some guidelines. what temp to cook this hunk of meat at? that's my first question. it's 14lbs of prime rib.

    I have read anywhere from 225 up to 500 degrees for cooking the roast. with an internal temp you want of 130-ish. no higher really as the roast continues to cook even while it's resting.. that part I understand.

    so what oven temp is best?

    i don't want to ruin a $90 piece of prime rib

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    check out Alton Brown's "Good eats"
    I like that he explains the ideas behind everything..
    I believe he starts @ 250d and then raises to 500d for 10min or so to make the crust.
    NOTE: It is a dry-Aged..takes 3 days, but all the reviews rage about it...

    I have never tried it, but it looks good. :)
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html

    Be sure and read all the comments details..that first one REALLY detailed orientated, but get the nuances in there...does say it is a bit of a PIA process, but worth it ;)
    " Thoughts;; I believe this process, while a royal pain, is so perfect that it isn't essential to start with the world's best cut of meat to end up with something so scrumptious that you risk reaching nirvana without return. Bottom Line ... Unquestionably the BEST MEAL I've even eaten, bar none!!!! Alton ... You da MAN !!!!"

    need I say more?
    Also my mom is in town and I can ask her in the am.
    She's the "bomb" when it comes to cookin'...I'll get back atcha.

    DAMN I got drollen just readin about it...hehe
    Last edited by kcoc321; 12-21-2009 at 05:04 AM.

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    Best way that I've made prime rib is with a rotisserie on an open charcoal/mesquite fire, Al. If you really have to cook it in an oven, I'd suggest the low temp and figure 30-45 minutes per pound. Turn the meat frequently.

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    it's winter here.. and open fire is out of the question... so oven it is. i'm sure it will turn out well.. as long as it doesn't reach to high of an internal temp and overcook it... then i'll have to feed it to the neighbor dog. ;)

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    You might check out the Joy of Cooking - it has a lot of good advise. I cooked a smaller one last night in a convection oven and what I do is cook the roast at 450 for about 15 minutes to sear the outside and keep the juices in and then lower the temp to 325. I cooked a 4 pounder for an hour and the ends came out med rare and the center was very rare (good for leftovers as there were only 2 of us). A meat thermometer is you best bet but be aware I have seen guidelines for rare as aything between 115 and 140. Make sure you put the roast on a rack. You can slow cook it at 225 but then it takes a lon long time to cook.
    Good luck, Phil

    PS Wat is you address so I can come share it with you?

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    Season meat. Brown the prime rib in a roasting pan placed over two burners. Place in oven at 250 degrees and cook until internal temperature reaches 125 degrees. Take our and cover with foil and let it set for 15 minutes. the edges will be brown and the insides will be medium rare right thru....

    cooking prime rib at high temperatures for extended times will result in the meat shrinking a lot with a loss of juices. the problem with low temp roasting is that there won't be much au jus.

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    Al,

    Pierce it and place long sliced garlic in the holes throughout. Rub it down with a little salt, coarse black pepper, and dried parsley. Go simple with the seasoning, you want the flavor of the meat to stand on it's own.

    On the stove drizzle EVOO in your roaster on a fairly high heat and sear all sides, fast and furious. Pour about 1/2 to 1 c. of wtaer in the bottom of your roaster and cover tightly with foil.

    Roast in a 325 degrees for around 15-20 minutes per pound. After about two hours, a prime should be 10 -12 lbs, start checking it with a meat thermometer thru the foil, 135 to 140 internal is medium. When it's around 115 internal, take off the foil to brown the ouside.

    Take it out of the roaster and let it rest on the board for 10 minutes or so. Deglaze you pan and make some au jus.

    Now cut that bitch up and let it melt in your mouth, Trust me the drooling shall commence...
    Last edited by amulford; 12-21-2009 at 11:49 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by danger boy View Post
    so I'm going to cook my first ever prime rib roast in a couple days. and I need some guidelines. what temp to cook this hunk of meat at? that's my first question. it's 14lbs of prime rib.

    I have read anywhere from 225 up to 500 degrees for cooking the roast. with an internal temp you want of 130-ish. no higher really as the roast continues to cook even while it's resting.. that part I understand.

    so what oven temp is best?

    i don't want to ruin a $90 piece of prime rib

    Honest to goodness, the best prime rib that I have ever had at home is when my mother-in-law used the Ron Popeil Showtime Rotisserie. She got it as a gag gift at work one year and we use it at least twice a year for prime rib. It was delicious.

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    +1 on the Alton Brown method, I use it,it works.;)

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    Quote Originally Posted by gdb View Post
    +1 on the Alton Brown method, I use it,it works.;)
    The one thing I would do is using the high temp first. When I have been forced to use an oven, I did 500 degrees for 10 minutes first to get a good crist and then took it down to 250 to finish it off over a few hours. Also, look at using a roasting pan with high sides. This applies more of a roasting effect and protects the roast from direct heat which can dry it out. Be generous with your seasoning, most will cook off.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorourke07 View Post
    The one thing I would do is using the high temp first. When I have been forced to use an oven, I did 500 degrees for 10 minutes first to get a good crist and then took it down to 250 to finish it off over a few hours. Also, look at using a roasting pan with high sides. This applies more of a roasting effect and protects the roast from direct heat which can dry it out. Be generous with your seasoning, most will cook off.
    This is how we do it as well. Along with making slits and stuffing them with garlic. We usually do ours with a peppercorn rub.
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    Another vote for Alton Brown's method.

    One thing I would recommend is to make sure your instant read thermometer is correct. Just place the tip in some boiling water and make sure it reads 212 degrees. I had a Polder probe thermometer that consistently was over 7 degrees off - which can make a difference with Prime Rib. If you are going to spend that kind of money, you might as well make sure you enjoy it. Make sure you take readings in several spots - the ends will cook faster than the middle. I would take it out at 125 or so in the middle, but I'm a rare/medium rare guy.

    Also, don't be shy with seasoning - rub the outside with a little canola oil and then lots and lots of kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. It's a very dense piece of meat and you want the seasonings to get down into it. Use more than you think you need.

    Lastly, I always try to go by something Bobby Flay said that I totally agree with - most cooks under season and over cook - good luck!

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    Ass backwards!!! Low heat first, remove when center temp is 110-115, cover loosely with foil while oven is set to highest temp possible, back into HOT oven for 10-15 min,remove and let rest for another 15-20 min. under loose foil. Do you know about Yorkshire Pudding ?? No ? Google it !!!:D

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    seems like there are a lot of right ways to cook a prime rib roast.. and all sound delicious to me. ;)

    I am taking in account what I have read and compairing notes.. I have the instant read thermomoter already.. so that's good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorourke07 View Post
    The one thing I would do is using the high temp first. When I have been forced to use an oven, I did 500 degrees for 10 minutes first to get a good crist and then took it down to 250 to finish it off over a few hours. Also, look at using a roasting pan with high sides. This applies more of a roasting effect and protects the roast from direct heat which can dry it out. Be generous with your seasoning, most will cook off.
    That's the way we do it and it's always turned out great.
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    Make sure the meat is room temp before you start cooking it.
    Please. Please contact me a ben62670 @ yahoo.com. Make sure to include who you are, and you are from Polk so I don't delete your email. Also I am now physically unable to work on any projects. If you need help let these guys know. There are many people who will help if you let them know where you are.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcoc321 View Post
    check out Alton Brown's "Good eats"
    I like that he explains the ideas behind everything..
    I believe he starts @ 250d and then raises to 500d for 10min or so to make the crust.
    NOTE: It is a dry-Aged..takes 3 days, but all the reviews rage about it...

    I have never tried it, but it looks good. :)
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html

    Be sure and read all the comments details..that first one REALLY detailed orientated, but get the nuances in there...does say it is a bit of a PIA process, but worth it ;)
    " Thoughts;; I believe this process, while a royal pain, is so perfect that it isn't essential to start with the world's best cut of meat to end up with something so scrumptious that you risk reaching nirvana without return. Bottom Line ... Unquestionably the BEST MEAL I've even eaten, bar none!!!! Alton ... You da MAN !!!!"

    need I say more?
    Also my mom is in town and I can ask her in the am.
    She's the "bomb" when it comes to cookin'...I'll get back atcha.

    DAMN I got drollen just readin about it...hehe
    I've used Alton's recipe dozen's of times and it comes out perfect each and every time.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorourke07 View Post
    The one thing I would do is using the high temp first. When I have been forced to use an oven, I did 500 degrees for 10 minutes first to get a good crist and then took it down to 250 to finish it off over a few hours. Also, look at using a roasting pan with high sides. This applies more of a roasting effect and protects the roast from direct heat which can dry it out. Be generous with your seasoning, most will cook off.
    That is the absolute worst thing you could do to a roast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hearingimpared View Post
    That is the absolute worst thing you could do to a roast.
    I dunno, the recipe I have is 500 degrees for 15 mins, then turn it down and cook it at 350 for 15 mins for every pound of meat.

    It turns out a nice and juicy med rare every time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivrrat View Post
    I dunno, the recipe I have is 500 degrees for 15 mins, then turn it down and cook it at 350 for 15 mins for every pound of meat.

    It turns out a nice and juicy med rare every time.

    I shop at a local speciality butcher shop in San Diego called Siesel's. They hand out recipes that have been time proven to give consistent results, which I have used successfully for several years.

    For a roast, their advise for a home oven is that rib roasts, crossribs, top loins, and top sirloins all require 'dry oven roasting' at 350 and cook *uncovered*.

    Cook time is not based on weight but on diameter of the cut. Makes sense if you think about it.

    Their advise admits that many 'professionals' use a lower temp and longer cooking time, but pros use pro ovens and problems with home ovens is that they very often don't hold even temps. And the lower temps work well for larger pieces.

    If you are cooking a 3 or 4 rib roast, then the 350 temp gives very consistent results when used with a good heat thermometer.

    For a 3 rib roast; cook 2 hours
    For a 4 rib roast; cook 2 hours, 15 minutes

    Cook to 120-125 for rare
    130 to medium rare
    135 to medium

    Let stand for 10-15 minutes

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    The lower the temp you cook at, the more even the temp will be of the roast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivrrat View Post
    I dunno, the recipe I have is 500 degrees for 15 mins, then turn it down and cook it at 350 for 15 mins for every pound of meat.

    It turns out a nice and juicy med rare every time.
    The problem there is you chance having up to an inch of well done (yuck) meat around the perimeter of the roast. If you cook it low and slow you get perfect continuity of rare (yum) or medium rare from edge to edge.

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    Just cook it at whatever temp. you want [the lower, the better] and make sure that there is a constant pan of hot water somewhere in the stove. This will help to maintain the juiciness and moisture. I always remove my meats when they are within 5-7 degrees of desired temperature. When you take it out, it will still be cooking and it will be done when you are ready to eat.

    Good luck and have fun!
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    i think 350 degree oven is plenty hot... i can't see going any higher than that... i have read it's best to lightly score the fat on the roast.. and over season it as well. i like the idea of inserting garlic into the meat too.

    i like my prime rib at medium rare with lots of horseradish ;)

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    As mentioned the other most important thing is to let your meat rest after the cooking a good 10-20 mins.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willow View Post
    As mentioned the other most important thing is to let your meat rest after the cooking a good 10-20 mins.
    We're still talking about cooking, right ;)

    1) Fat on top when in the oven.
    2) Definitely take out of the fridge a couple of hours before roasting.
    3) Cook uncovered.
    4) I do it the cheap and dirty way. Oven at 500(or 550 if you got it) for 5-15 minutes depending on taste, then drop to 300 to finish it off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShinAce View Post
    We're still talking about cooking, right ;)

    1) Fat on top when in the oven.
    2) Definitely take out of the fridge a couple of hours before roasting.
    3) Cook uncovered.
    4) I do it the cheap and dirty way. Oven at 500(or 550 if you got it) for 5-15 minutes depending on taste, then drop to 300 to finish it off.
    You're still alive? and you cook !?! ;)
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    I also need to cook a roast for the first time this Christmas... great thread!

    Here's a crazy recipe I found. It has good reviews but man with all that salt it would be a leap of faith!

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Kosher-...st/Detail.aspx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetmaker737 View Post
    I also need to cook a roast for the first time this Christmas... great thread!

    Here's a crazy recipe I found. It has good reviews but man with all that salt it would be a leap of faith!

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Kosher-...st/Detail.aspx
    Just like with Alton Brown's recipe the salted parts gets cut off.

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